Colorwork stitch dictionaries.

Our current Strange Brew colorwork design classes have students itching for books of colorwork inspiration – stitch dictionaries in particular, books full of motifs that can be applied to a variety of projects. Three of our favorites are back in stock – let’s take a look!

Andrea Rangel’s Alterknits is a playful collection of 200 non-traditional colorwork stitch patterns, with geometric and figural patterns alike – from chevrons and op-art motifs to bicycles, chickens, and sheep.

Mary Jane Mucklestone’s 200 Fair Isle Motifs is focused on the particular Scottish colorwork tradition for which it is named.

Mucklestone has organized the motifs by the number of rows and stitches in each pattern repeat, making it easy to find a pattern that divides evenly into the number of stitches you’re working with on any given project – hat, socks, sweater, etc. Each chart is shown not only in the traditional black-dots-on-a-white-grid style, but also in a color photograph, a color variation, and an all-over version, giving the knitter a jump start on adapting these patterns for many uses.

Mucklestone brings the same inspiring approach to her 150 Scandinavian Motifs, which shares colorwork stitch patterns from Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Iceland and the Faroe Islands.

Come by the shop to browse these and other books! We hope you find inspiration here.

Pom Pom Quarterly: Winter 2018.

The Winter 2018 issue of Pom Pom Quarterly has arrived here at the shop!

Pom Pom is a beautifully designed magazine, carefully put together by writers and editors who clearly love printed matter as much as they love knitwear. This issue is guest edited by none other than Norah Gaughan, who was also featured in the most recent Mason-Dixon Knitting Field Guide. Fans of Norah Gaughan have a lot to be excited about this season!

“The knits in this issue are imagined for the modern heroine,” write the Pom Pom editors, and the designs do evoke strength and drama. They are also highly embellished, whether with whimsical tassels, graphic colorwork, bold cables, bobbles, or gathers.

Many of the designer names in this issue are familiar, the likes of Joji Locatelli, Caitlin Hunter, Andrea Rangel, and Veronik Avery, whose contribution is knit with one of our favorite yarns, Brooklyn Tweed Arbor.

Anna Maltz’s column is always a thought provoking, interesting read, focusing this time on notions of tradition and historicity in knitting. She rightly points out that “Tradition is not inherently good,” and asks instead that we celebrate the ever-evolving nature of our craft, and the talented people that continue to contribute to it with new designs, techniques, and technology.

Come by the shop to get a closer look at this striking issue of Pom Pom!