Back in stock: Fibre Company Acadia.

We’re delighted to announce that Fibre Company Acadia is back in stock!

Acadia is a DK weight blend of merino, alpaca, and slubs of silk. The silk takes the dye differently than the other fibers, giving most colorways a rustic, tweedy appearance, which belies its luxuriously soft hand.

Our supply of this special yarn had dwindled, but happily, a shipment arrived earlier in the week to fill our shelves again.

Acadia has become a very well-loved yarn in the years we’ve stocked it here at the shop. One knitter that calls this yarn a favorite is Winnie, who recently knit this gorgeous “Dohne” shawl using Acadia.

Garments knit with Acadia have a mix of structure and drape. We have a couple of samples knit in Acadia at the shop so you can see and feel this in person; look for the Churchmouse “Easy Folded Poncho” and “Quaking Aspen” shawl next time you’re here. There are so many other wonderful projects we’ve seen made in Acadia over the years – check out our “DK weight” Pinterest board for more pattern ideas.

Come by to give Acadia a squeeze and plan your next project!

Fibre Company Trunk Show: the Borrowdale Collection.

We’re so excited to announce that we’ve just received a Trunk Show featuring Fibre Company Lore. Come by the shop to see the Borrowdale Collection!

Lore is the newest yarn from Fibre Company, a woolen spun, DK weight, 100% Romney lambswool. It has a rustic look and texture at home in hard-wearing, workaday garments, and is sturdy enough to last a lifetime when cared for.

We just got six new colors in last week, making our Lore selection complete!

The Borrowdale Collection was designed with everyday adventures in mind, and the garments featured here are as practical as they are beautiful, rich with cables and texture and color. All of these patterns are available on Ravelry, or here at the shop as Ravelry In-Store Sales.

Hurry in to admire the Borrowdale Collection Trunk Show, try some sweaters on for size, and plan one for yourself. We’re offering a 10% discount on Lore during the show, too – all the more reason to stop by and admire!

A reminder: all sales are final on discounted items; there will be no exchanges or returns. Thanks!

Laine Magazine, No. 6.

Last week, we welcomed another beautiful new issue of Laine Magazine.

Laine Magazine is a publication out of Finland, a knitting and lifestyle magazine with a love of natural fibers and handicraft as its focus. It’s only a couple of years old, but it already has quite a following, and a reputation for beautiful designs and tantalizing photography.

Inside this issue of Laine, you’ll find a mix of knitting patterns, articles, recipes, profiles on fiber artists, and a travel guide to Reykjavik.

There are lots of familiar names sprinkled throughout this issue, like Andrea Mowry, Tukuwool, Shannon Cook, Brooklyn Tweed, Nancy Marchant, and Fibre Company, but we love getting to know new designers and yarn companies through Laine, too.

Come by the shop to page through Laine and our other books and magazines. We hope you find inspiration here!

Hello, Fibre Co. Lore.

We’re happy to announce that our first new line of yarn for autumn has arrived, from one of our favorite purveyors – meet Lore, from the Fibre Company!

Lore is a woolen spun DK weight yarn, composed of 100% Romney lambswool. It’s somewhat robust for a DK weight, knitting up comfortably between 5 and 5.5 stitches per inch in stockinette stitch. With it’s toothy texture, Lore is not the softest fiber in our shop, but it’s sturdy and full of character, just the kind of yarn I love most.

Woolen-spun yarns are lofty and especially warm for their weight, due to the air trapped between their jumbled fibers. They have a rustic look and texture at home in hard-wearing, workaday garments, and are sturdy enough to last a lifetime when cared for. 

The design team at the Fibre Company has been hard at work on a large pattern collection for Lore called Borrowdale. It features 20 garments and accessories knit with Lore, and one crocheted cowl. These pieces were designed with everyday adventures in mind, and though they’re practical, they’re also beautiful, rich with cables and texture and color.

We have a Borrowdale lookbook here at the shop with photos and details about each design, but the patterns themselves are available on Ravelry. See them in action in the Fibre Company’s Online Trunk Show, a video narrated by company founder Daphne.

“Galleny Force” is the pullover I’ve begun swatching for with Lore, though with as many large yarn shipments as we’ve had this week, I can’t say I’m making much progress – still and all, I’m delighted to have this yarn on my needles.

Look for Fibre Company Lore in the DK weight section here at our shop!

Show and tell: Fibre Company and Shibui.

Time for more show and tell! Earlier in the month, I shared projects made with yarns from a few of our favorite sources, Isager, Malabrigo, and CoopKnits. Of course there are plenty more yarn companies we adore, and today, I’ll highlight two more. We’ve seen an abundance of beautiful projects knit with Fibre Company and Shibui yarns over the years – here are some of the most recent.

Rosi knit this exquisite “Pomegranate” pullover for her daughter using Fibre Company Acadia. This soft, tweedy yarn is attractive all on its own, but shows intricate stitch patterns beautifully, too.

Here’s Shelley in her “Rathbone” pullover, knit with Arranmore Light, another tweedy Fibre Company yarn. Both Acadia and Arranmore Light are DK weight and well suited to sweater-making, thanks to their balance of softness and structure.

Gloria wandered into the shop a few months ago, looking for inspiration, and found it in our Shibui Sample of the Month at the time, the “Comfort Zone” wrap, knit with Drift. I love the jewel tones she selected for her own wrap – well done, Gloria!

Above is Anne’s second Churchmouse “Easy Folded Poncho,” this time in Shibui Reed, a lightweight linen for summertime wear.

Look for Anne’s ponchos side by side here at the shop, one for spring and summer and one for fall and winter, in – what else – Fibre Company Acadia.

Thanks to everyone who brings their finished projects to show us, we absolutely love seeing what you make. See you at the shop!

Knitscene.

The Fall 2018 issue of Knitscene arrived this week!

As the days get hotter, I start to fantasize about cooler days, though they’re months away. Magazines like this, full of woolen sweaters, can be a nice retreat from the heat of summer if it doesn’t happen to be your favorite season.

I spotted some of our favorite yarns in this issue; along with the cover sweater in Swans Island All American Worsted, there’s also a cabled cardigan in Brooklyn Tweed Shelter and a pullover in Fibre Company Cumbria Worsted.

Look for Knitscene on the teacart, where the latest books and magazines are stacked high, ready to inspire your next projects. See you at the shop!

New summer scents from Harmony Farm Candles.

Each season brings a new selection of tempting scents from Harmony Farm Candles, and three just arrived at the shop to ease us into summer.

Harmony Farm Candles is run by our friend Erin in nearby Mebane, North Carolina. She hand-pours her candles in small batches using 100% US-sourced soy wax, with no added dyes. Their scents are fresh and bright, but not overwhelming – “delightfully fragranced,” as she puts it.

Tomato Garden is a unique scent, smelling exactly of tomato plants warm from the sun. It’s fresh and green and perfectly conjures the season. Shown here with a couple of tomato-red skeins of Brooklyn Tweed Peerie.

Honeysuckle is another one that smells just like its namesake, a sweet floral scent. Pictured here with a trio of colors in Kelbourne Woolens Andorra.

Passionfruit Guava is a new one for us, sweet-tart and fruity. It brought to mind this juicy shade of Fibre Company Arranmore Light.

Harmony Farm Candles are a perfect companion to an evening of knitting, and these 8 oz travel tins make them handy for summer trips. As gifts, they are always warmly-received; keep them in mind for holiday and host gifts, birthdays, and the odd just-thinking-of-you occasion. Look for Harmony Farm Candles in our gifts section!

Show and tell: Hitofude.

Amy has now taught her “Hitofude” cardigan class three times at our shop, and has just begun a fourth. With an unusual construction and a repetitive lace motif, Hiroko Fukatsu’s “Hitofude” is a gracefully draped garment that many knitters have been drawn to. So far, we’ve seen five finished garments come out of these classes, and I can’t wait to share them with you!

Above is Amy’s own “Hitofude,” knit with Shibui Staccato. The combination of silk and superwash merino means drape and shine, both of which bring elegance to this piece.

Many of Amy’s students chose Staccato for their “Hitofude” cardigans; here’s Jane in hers.

Jane lengthened the sleeves and the body of the sweater for exactly the fit she wanted, and it came out just right.

Margie made similar modifications, but used Fibre Company Cumbria Fingering, a wool/mohair blend with more structure and less drape than Staccato. It makes a more substantial garment appropriate for fall and winter, and Margie is happy with the results.

Pam used Madeline Tosh Merino Light for her sweater, which looks springy and playful in a tonally variegated chartreuse. It’s not a yarn we carry at the shop, but Malabrigo Mechita is similar – a hand-dyed, single ply, superwash merino.

This group photo shows Linda, second from the left, in her “Hitofude,” knit with Shibui Staccato. She kept the original sleeve and body length of the pattern for a slightly cropped silhouette. It’s amazing what an impact these slight differences can have from one garment to the next, even with the same pattern – we love seeing knitters in self-made sweaters that reflect their preferences and show off their skills!

Thanks to these knitters for sharing their work with us, and especially for participating in classes here at the shop. We feel so lucky to have such talented teachers on our team, and students who are excited to learn more about their craft. I’m so looking forward to seeing more “Hitofude” cardigans as they’re completed!

Vogue Knitting and Interweave Knits.

Two new magazines arrived this week, fresh issues of Vogue Knitting and Interweave Knits.

Lace is a theme of this most recent issue of Vogue, with a feature from Meg Swansen on the subject and lots of garments and accessories in openwork patterns.

This leafy top is knit with Fibre Company Luma, a DK weight blend of 50% merino wool, 25% organic cotton, 15% linen, and 10% silk.

The latest issue of Interweave Knits features a Fibre Company yarn, too – Courtney Spainhower’s “Whitehorn Shawl” is shown in Cumbria Worsted.

Look for Vogue and Interweave Knits on the teacart here at our shop, amongst the newest books and magazines. See you there!

Show and tell: colorwork sweaters.

Two blog posts full of colorwork knitting just aren’t enough – here’s a third, with a focus on sweaters.

Here Margie models her “Townes” pullover, knit with a clever combination of speckled Malabrigo Mechita and a few solid and heathered shades of Jamieson’s Shetland Spindrift.

Emily’s first adult-sized colorwork sweater is a perfect fit and features a beautiful, distinctive color combination – the pattern is tincanknits’ “Dog Star,” and the yarn is the unbeatable Brooklyn Tweed Arbor.

Kate has just finished a “Dog Star,” too, on a smaller scale for her daughter. For this one, she’s used Fibre Co. Arranmore Light, but she has another in the works in Arbor – can’t wait to see that one, too!

From left to right, here are Claire, Tom, Jayne, Barbara, Barbara, and Amy, all in their “St. Brendan” pullovers knit during Amy’s class on the subject. It’s so fun to see all these different color combinations together, not to mention all these happy knitters sporting their own handiwork!

Thanks so much to the knitters pictured above, and to everyone who’s ever taught or taken a class here, or started a project with a trip to our shop – we’re so grateful for all of you! It’s our community that makes our shop special. See you there!