Knitscene.

The Spring 2017 issue of Knitscene arrived over the weekend, an unseasonable but not unwelcome new magazine full of tempting patterns and useful tutorials.

Knitscene features a couple of articles on technique in each issue, but this one I think will prove especially essential reading: a pattern-reading tutorial on how to manage the sometimes befuddling instructions, “at the same time…”

This lacy, open-front cardigan is knit in one of our favorites, Fibre Company Acadia, a soft and tweedy blend of merino, alpaca, and silk.

Look for Knitscene and other new publications here at the shop. See you there!

Show and tell: colorwork.

We love to see finished projects that started life as yarn on our shelves, and when I’m able, I love to photograph them and share them here on the blog. I noticed a theme running through my current stash of show-and-tell photos: colorwork. I’m defining that term broadly to include stripes, colorblocks, stranded knitting and intarsia – all the myriad methods for changing colors as you knit.

We’ll begin with Margie, who brought two special pieces in for us to see, both designed by Kieran Foley. Above is “Lotus Crescent,” a unique shawl bursting with techniques from lace to stranded knitting to intarsia – sometimes all three in the space of one row! Margie used Jamieson’s Shetland Spindrift for this one, eager to play with the large color palette.

Kieran Foley’s patterns are not for the faint of heart, but Margie persevered. Below is her “Zanzibar” scarf, knit with Schoppel-Wolle Crazy Zauberball and a variety of fingering weight scraps.

Loretta knit Melanie Berg’s “Drachenfels” shawl with three shades of Fibre Company Cumbria Fingering, a yarn she’s since used for mittens and has come to love.

This adorable “Pandamonium” hat was Wanda’s first attempt at stranded knitting, and she did a great job! The yarn is Rowan Pure Wool Superwash DK, and she came back for more to make another colorwork hat, encouraged by the success of this one.

Margaretta knit this “3 Color Cashmere Cowl” with Fibre Company Canopy Fingering in a most appealing trio of colors: two greens and a dark charcoal. It was a beautiful combination when I first saw it as three skeins of yarn, only to grow more beautiful as Margaretta stitched them into a cozy cowl.

Ruth knit the “Dreambird” shawl below using Schoppel-Wolle Starke 6 and Swans Island Natural Colors Merino Fingering, with help from a class on the subject here at the shop. The pairing of a self-striping yarn with a semi-solid hand-dyed yarn is a striking one for this pattern, perfect for showing off the short-row shaping.

Thanks to the knitters, crocheters, and weavers who bring in their work to show us what they’ve made! You inspire and amaze us, and we can’t wait to see what you get into next. Hope to see you at the shop soon, but do note our holiday hours, which are always posted on the main page of our website:

Saturday, Dec. 24: 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Sunday, Dec. 25: closed

Saturday, Dec. 31st: 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Sunday, Jan. 1st, 2017: closed

New magazines and books for crocheters.

It’s been a busy month or so for new publications here at the shop. In fact, some of our newest books and magazines come and go quickly after an Instagram introduction, not even lasting long enough on our shelves to warrant a blog post. For today, I’ll shine a light on the two latest crochet magazines, in case you’ve missed them in all the hubbub.

The Winter 2017 issue of Interweave Crochet features an article on practicing mindfulness with crochet, something many makers understand well. There’s also a tutorial on crochet chart-reading, a must for those looking to move into more complicated patterning.

This issue of Crochet Scene is packed full of patterns for garments, accessories, jewelry, and home goods, made in yarns ranging from lace weight to super bulky.

Courtney Kelley, of Kelbourne Woolens, has designed a cowl for this issue, made with Fibre Company Tundra.

Other recent acquisitions in the crochet department include Tamara Kelly’s Quick Crochet for the Home, Kate Bruning’s Let’s Go Camping: Crochet Your Own Adventure, and Modern Crochet Mandalas.

Come by the shop to see the latest crochet publications, and to plan your next project!

Show and tell: for grown-ups.

I’m back with another round of show-and-tell, this time for the grown-ups among us.

img_2123

Kellie has been busy crocheting “Artfully Simple Infinity Scarves” with Noro Silk Garden Lite. She reports that the pattern is as easy as its title suggests, but that it’s endlessly entertaining, especially with colorful self-striping yarns like these.

img_2125

They’re long enough to be worn doubled, as shown above, but short enough to hang around one’s neck simply, as shown below; either way makes an eye-catching accessory.

img_2124

dscn6087

Margie’s needles are always busy, and she’s so prolific a knitter that these finished projects are already well behind her. Still, they bear sharing: above is her “Inverness Cape,” knit in Berroco Ultra Alpaca, and below is her “Escher Poncho,” knit in Malabrigo Rios, with a bit of Fibre Company Cumbria Worsted around the edge.

dscn6242

And there’s more: here’s Margie’s third “ZickZack Scarf,” knit with Schoppel-Wolle Zauberball and Debbie Bliss Rialto Lace held doubled throughout.

dscn6438

Catherine knit this beautiful “On the Spice Market” with Shibui Staccato, a merino/silk blend that has the perfect drape and luster for this shawl.

img_1956

She carefully chose colors inspired by those shown in the pattern photo, with a few adjustments to make it her own.

img_1957

Here’s another Melanie Berg pattern, “Sunwalker,” knit by Emma with the brand new Isager Merilin. This is a shawl that the photo doesn’t do justice, as it’s the texture and hand of the fabric that stood out most to me; shawl-knitters, consider Merilin when fingering weight yarn is called for!

dscn6376

Below is Amy’s “Copenhagen Hood,” a quick cozy accessory knit in Fibre Company Tundra, living temporarily at the shop as a sample for her upcoming class on the subject. There are still spaces in her class, if you’d like to join and knit a hood of your own…sign up on our website!

img_2083

Joanne knit this “Rise” hat with Shibui Drift and Silk Cloud held together, and was so pleased with it that she came back for more yarn to knit one for her husband. I understand the appeal, seeing how well this came out! I can hardly imagine a softer yarn combination, truly.

dscn6440

Nancy knit this “Flowers of Life” pullover for her husband, using a beautiful palette of Jamieson’s Shetland Spindrift in an intricate all-over fair isle pattern. She’s graciously left it at the shop for a few weeks for all to see and admire; come in soon to see this knitted work of art!

img_2068

Joanne also has some Jamieson’s Shetland Spindrift show and tell: a “Beginner’s Fair Isle Cap,” her first-ever colorwork project. With guidance from Nancy, she selected this color combination and arranged the colors within the motif for a unique accesory.

dscn6378

Thanks again to the knitters and crocheters who share their work with us. We feel lucky to play a part in your creative pursuits, and look forward to seeing the projects you plan!

Arranmore Collection Trunk Show!

Yesterday we were pleasantly surprised to receive a highly-anticipated trunk show a full week earlier than expected. Come by the shop to see the Kelbourne Woolens Arranmore Collection in person!

img_2112

This group of cozy garments and accessories is named for the yarn it features: Fibre Company Arranmore, a bulky weight tweed composed of merino, cashmere and silk.

DSCN6175

One of the most notable qualities of Arranmore is its loftiness in spite of its bulky gauge. Sweaters knit in bulky yarn can droop and sag with time, but Arranmore holds its shape, warm but not heavy.

img_2116 img_2114

Anne’s completed “Carrowkeel” hangs with this show, though if you’ve been to the shop in the last month or so you’ve likely seen it already. It’s such a classic, this simple stockinette turtleneck, and it looks even better on than it does on the wall. Though the wall is where it’s lived since she sewed its last seam, I did convince her to pose for a photo.

dscn6309

Look for the Arranmore Collection Trunk Show here at the Hillsborough Yarn Shop, on display until November 27th! Perhaps you’ll find your next project among the collection. See you at the shop!

New colors in Canopy Fingering.

Back in June, we selected new shades in Fibre Company Canopy Fingering, a luxurious fingering weight blend of alpaca, merino, and bamboo. One or two of those colors arrived shortly thereafter, but the rest were on backorder, so our small basket of Canopy Fingering remained nearly-empty. Then just last week, a box arrived from Kelbourne Woolens, packed up tight with our Canopy Fingering order, and this small basket looks so much happier!

img_1996

Earlier this year, I knit a “3 Color Cashmere Cowl” with Canopy Fingering, and though it contains no cashmere, it’s perfectly suited to the pattern due to its drapey nature and soft hand.

DSCN5923

My first impulse upon unpacking these new shades of Canopy Fingering was to make trios with this cowl in mind. Here’s a combination very close to what I used for the cowl above, brightened with a pop of blue: Macaw, Manatee, and Chiclet Tree.

dscn6387

Below are Obsidian, Crocus, and Purple Passion, for those who love purple.

dscn6390

For the next trio, I kept Obsidion for contrast but swapped out the purples for warmer, brighter shades, Red Ginger and Mango.

dscn6388

What colors would you pull from this candy-colored basket? Come by the shop to play the color game as you plan your next project!

img_1995

Handwoven.

The latest issue of Handwoven magazine is here!

dscn6338

This issue focuses on mixing yarns of varied weights for different effects.

dscn6339

I was so happy to spot this feature by Kate Gagnon Osborn, of Kelbourne Woolens, about weaving with Fibre Company yarns like Meadow, Cumbria Worsted, Road to China Lace, Acadia, and Canopy Fingering.

dscn6340

Both halves of the Kelbourne Woolens’ team have backgrounds in weaving, and I’m thrilled to see it applied to these wonderful yarns that we’re used to seeing in a knit or crochet context.

14650618_1235609346504513_870666197457960752_n

Those of you who follow us on Instagram may already know that Schacht Cricket Looms are back in stock, along with Zoom Looms and copies of the inspiring Weavers Idea Book. Come by the shop to pick up a copy of Handwoven and plan your next weaving project!

knit.wear.

Update: this issue of knit.wear is sold out!

____________

The latest issue of knit.wear is here, and it’s flying off our shelves!

dscn6371

This stylish magazine from Interweave is notably garment-oriented, a publication with more sweater patterns than accessories.

dscn6372

I spotted some familiar yarns in this issue: a sweater knit in Shibui Pebble, with a bit of Shibui Cima on the bottom edge for a layered look, and a lace-edged poncho in Fibre Company Canopy Fingering.

dscn6374

Maybe it’s just because I’m finishing up a cardigan at the moment, but for me the standout feature of this issue was a new-to-me buttonband technique from designer Sarah Solomon.

dscn6373

Come by the shop to pick up a copy of knit.wear while they last!

dscn6375

Show and tell: accessories.

It’s been less than a month since my last “show and tell” blog post, but already there’s so much to share. Here are some of the finished projects that started life as yarn on our shelves!

dscn6348Above is the “Rise” hat, knit by Robin, who is teaching an upcoming class on the subject here at the shop. She made it with two yarns held together throughout: Shibui’s newest yarn, Drift, and their classic Silk Cloud. This pattern is free with the purchase of Shibui yarns for the project, and features cozy cables and a tidy tubular cast-on.

dscn6350

Below is Robin’s “Rise” cowl, knit with Fibre Company Canopy Worsted and Shibui Silk Cloud held together throughout, an equally luxurious yarn combination for the project.
dscn6354

Sign up for the Rise Hat or Cowl class on our website!

dscn6342

Here’s the subject of another upcoming class, Marsha’s “Super Fast Mittens,” a pattern she’s made available for sale here at the shop. Made with Plymouth Baby Alpaca Grande, they’re quick and cozy, designed with ease of knitting in mind. Join the class for an introduction to double-pointed needles!

dscn6038

Peggy brought two finished accessories in for show and tell; above is her “Basket Whip” cowl, knit in the (sadly discontinued) Fibre Company Savannah, and below is her “Holden” shawl, knit in Geilsk Cotton/Wool. Both yarns are well-balanced blends of plant and animal fibers, lightweight from fibers like linen and cotton, but plush from merino wool.

dscn6040

Ruth knit this “Rhys” scarf in Fibre Company Knightsbridge, a fuzzy heathered blend of llama, merino, and silk. It’s a handsome piece, decorated with cables and texture patterns, and the yarn is so well-suited to a next-to-skin accessory.

dscn6009

Petra has been on a Steve Rousseau kick, knitting and crocheting several of his intricate shawls in a row. Her latest is this “Dimitri Rectangular Shawl,” knit in the lightweight, tweedy Shibui Pebble. 

dscn6002

Thanks to everyone who shares their creations with us, those who gamely submit to my photography as well as those who’d rather not. We love seeing what you’re working on, and the pleasure and satisfaction that you derive from your finished projects.

See you at the shop!

Interweave Knits, Holiday 2016.

The Holiday 2016 issue of Interweave Knits has arrived!

dscn6244

This special issue features festive knits for giving and decorating during the holidays.

dscn6247

There are a variety of heirloom garments and accessories, of course, like this intricate cabled cape knit in Fibre Company Cumbria Fingering.

dscn6245

I particularly like this spread of patterns based on the knitterly illustrations of childrens’ book author Jan Brett. What a special gift this colorwork stocking would make with a copy of The Hat!

dscn6248

Come by the shop to browse the newest magazines and plan your holiday gift-making!

dscn6246